USA TODAY – One of the most famous, highest-paid movie stars in the world gets lonely sometimes, too.

It’s an unmooring Scarlett Johansson explores in two films this fall that bookend a century: First, in WWII satire “Jojo Rabbit” (in theaters Friday in Los Angeles and New York, expanding through October and November), she plays Rosie, a German mother worrying about her 10-year-old zealot whose imaginary friend is, yes, Hitler (Taika Waititi of “Thor: Ragnarok,” who also directs). Then Johansson debuts Netflix’s “Marriage Story” (in theaters Nov. 6 in New York and Los Angeles, streaming Dec. 6) in which she plays Nicole, a once-famous actress rediscovering herself as she divorces her husband (Adam Driver), a decorated New York theater director.

As Johansson, 34, approached the dual roles, limbo became new, too: She was mid-divorce with her second husband, French journalist Romain Dauriac, with whom she shares a 5-year-old daughter, Rose.

“I’ve felt in the past – there’s such a loneliness to being a single parent,” says Johansson, whose vibe is frank (and admittedly a bit jet-lagged) today and dressed movie-star casual: jeans, a tomato-red ribbed Alexander Wang top and black stilettos. “Obviously, it’s a lot of many different things at once, but there can be a loneliness and this constant feeling of doubt, that you don’t know what the hell you’re doing and you don’t have anyone else to bounce it off of.”

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In her first cover for the publication since appearing on the UK edition back in 2013, Scarlett is gracing the cover of the Women in Hollywood issue of ELLE. She joins Nicole Kidman, Mindy Kaling, Dolly Parton, and Natalie Portman as one of the 8 women selected to front the special edition. Coverage from Scarlett’s interview can be found below, and the issue hits newsstands on October 22 – so be sure to pick up a copy, it’s a beautiful shoot (and cover).

ELLE – Early on in Noah Baumbach’s Marriage Story, we see Scarlett Johansson’s Nicole, a woman in her midthirties who’s fond of oatmeal-colored cardigans and whose Instagram bio might read “mother, wife, actress, in that order,” seated on a sofa inside her divorce attorney’s office. Soon, she’ll dive into her story, a six-minute-long monologue that’s equal parts raw and precise: the story of someone who hasn’t been truly heard in months, maybe years (and a scene that will likely resurface during awards-show broadcasts). But first, Nicole is just a woman on a couch—looking dead-tired in a wrinkly button-down shirt and DIY haircut—waiting. When her lawyer (Laura Dern) finally breezes in, impeccably coiffed but apologizing for looking “schleppy,” Nicole glances down at her shirt and sighs. It’s a small moment, but one that made this exhausted mom, wife, and journalist feel seen.

Johansson also felt an almost eerie sense of connection when Baumbach handed her the monologue over lunch in the fall of 2017.“It was the first piece Noah gave me, and it felt familiar somehow, but not because of what I’d been experiencing then,” says the actress, 34, who at the time was embroiled in her own separation, from French curator Romain Dauriac. “But maybe because of how I grew up, and the dynamic between my parents—or maybe because I’ve known women who’ve dedicated themselves to their partner’s vision and then come out of this decade-long relationship feeling almost like a ghost.” She adds that she, too, has been in that place, and that the truth in Nicole’s story was what excited her. “I didn’t hesitate at all, because I knew that I’d have the opportunity to say those words,” she says. “Noah gave me that monologue, and I was like, ‘Well, shit, come on.’ Am I going to be like, ‘Nah, I’m good—let some other actor have that’? No way.”

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USA TODAY – As “Avengers: Endgame” closes in on its finale (in theaters Friday), Black Widow is just getting started.

Scarlett Johansson, who has played the Russian spy since launching the character in “Iron Man 2” in 2010, laughs whenever a question is posed on the long-awaited “Black Widow” spinoff, which many have speculated will go into production this year.

The 34-year-old actress starts and stops a couple of times before finally blurting out, “I don’t even think I can say a single thing! And that makes my job easier and harder at the same time.”

Wait, Johansson can’t even say how she feels about the idea of Black Widow finally getting her own film? Or if she’s ramping up workouts to prepare? “No, I can’t!” she says, fully under the scrutiny of a Disney representative sitting on the floor behind her. “Really.”

Johansson, along with Robert Downey Jr. (Iron Man), Chris Evans (Captain America), Mark Ruffalo (Hulk), Jeremy Renner (Hawkeye) and Chris Hemsworth (Thor), is one of the O.G. Avengers, having arrived in the Marvel Cinematic Universe way before the new kids like Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman) and Captain Marvel (Brie Larson) came around.

“It’s been a very transformative decade,” says Johansson. “When my character started in ‘Iron Man 2,’ she was like a souped-up secretary with a skill set on the side.”

Indeed, her character has weathered the best and worst of Marvel, including blatant sexism: “Avengers: Endgame” co-director Joe Russo found a “disturbing” lack of Black Widow toys available for kids around 2015’s “Avengers: Age of Ultron,” and consequently she was included in the first action-figure wave for 2016’s “Captain America: Civil War.”

Experts are surprised it’s taken so long for Johansson, who drove the 2014 action film “Lucy” to $463.4 million worldwide at the box office, to be granted a Marvel spinoff. But while her Widow waited, “female superheroes have evolved into being far more than just a pretty face or a hypersexualized presence,” says Karie Bible, box office analyst for Exhibitor Relations. “They have ample power and agency of their own and don’t require a romantic interest. Times have changed and these movies are changing with them.”

Johansson agrees that the MCU has evolved.

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Labels: Articles and Interviews, Avengers: Endgame, Projects

THE GUARDIAN – Hollywood quickly made room on its red carpets for the young Scarlett Johansson in 2003, when she first created a stir in Sofia Coppola’s film, Lost in Translation. It seemed clear that this blonde bombshell from New York, who was so ably sharing the screen with a dyspeptic Bill Murray, would go on to deliver popcorn buckets-full of mainstream audience appeal. Beautiful, mysterious and charismatic: she was already an aspirational trophy for any traditional leading man.

Yet, 14 years on, Johansson is established instead as a rather different sort of screen idol. Following a succession of high-octane blockbusters and off-beat critical hits, the actress is now enshrined as perhaps the leading sci-fi action star of her generation. Where once her sardonic smirks and sultry looks spoke of old-school movie glamour, she is now more likely to grab the limelight by kickboxing than by smouldering.

From this Friday, Johansson, 32, will be seen fighting her way to further futuristic box office glory from the midst of a vast, glassy pool of water. Ghost in the Shell, her new cyborg film, is based on Japanese anime characters and features a key combat scene set in a dystopian urban lake. It is a watery sequence clearly designed to become a totemic bit of modern cinema, like that horizontal tussle in The Matrix or the folding streetscape in Inception.

Whether or not the British director Rupert Sanders’s new film achieves the status of a sci-fi classic, it is clear that Johansson, who earned a rumoured £12.4m, has increasingly steered her career towards unexpectedly violent and often unnerving roles. While it is true that she has tackled a few family-oriented outings over the years, such as Cameron Crowe’s We Bought a Zoo in 2011, it is her more aggressive work in zip-up Lycra that has earned her a place up among the Hollywood A-listers.

This adventurous side of Johansson was most apparent in 2013, when she took the part of the alien in Under the Skin. A horror film directed by Brit Jonathan Glazer, it was a big risk for the star, not just because she would be playing a carnivorous, marauding visitor from another planet, nor because the film had been notoriously hard to make, but because she had to work on location in Glasgow, driving around in a Transit van and interacting with real people, many of whom had no idea they were taking part in the film.

The risk paid off in style. Many critics agreed with the Guardian’s Peter Bradshaw in finding Under the Skin “visually stunning and deeply disturbing: very freaky, very scary and very erotic”.

At the same time as Glazer’s weird thriller came out, a voice-role that Johansson had recorded for director Spike Jonze was to underline the actress’s move towards sci-fi. She played Samantha, a captivating computer operating system in his film, Her.

By then, the star had also taken up the screen persona that was to project her right into the heart of a global superhero franchise. Since 2012, she has played Natasha Romanoff, the Black Widow of the Marvel Avengers series. First donning her black Neoprene jumpsuit for Avengers Assemble, the actress has already reprised the Black Widow role three times and is currently filming Avengers: Infinity War.

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Labels: Articles and Interviews, Ghost in the Shell, Projects

MARIE CLAIRE – In 2015, Scarlett Johansson was presenting at the Oscars, walking the red carpet in an emerald Atelier Versace gown and a dramatic matching Swarovski necklace. But she was more concerned with another accessory. “I had to bring my breast pump, because I was nursing and every ounce is like liquid gold,” says the actress, who had given birth to her daughter, Rose, five months earlier. After the ceremony, she reunited with it in the company of mutual friends Kelly Ripa and her husband, Mark Consuelos, but not for long.

“Somehow, Mark got ahold of my breast pump—in a bag with all the milk, ice packs in there, and shit. He grabbed it out of my hand,” Johansson recalls. He was just trying to help, she explains, “but our cars got separated. Apparently, Kelly looked over, and she was like, ‘Wait a minute—is that Scarlett’s breast pump? We’ve got to get it back!’ because she knew how panicked I would be. We finally ended up at the same party three hours later, and Mark was like, ‘I’m so sorry.'”

Johansson, 32, laughs her throaty laugh and takes a sip of rooibos tea. Sitting with her in the Gotham Lounge at The Peninsula hotel in Manhattan, it’s hard not to feel a sense of kinship. Minutes ago, I was pumping in the hotel bathroom—she told her story in solidarity. “It’s very humbling,” she says of motherhood. When I absentmindedly shift around my maternity bra, she asks, “How’s your boobs? Are they square? That was always my favorite.”

For someone who has spent the past several years playing a superhero in Marvel’s Avengers franchises, Johansson is refreshingly human. “Sorry I look like such a hobo,” she says. Having just wrapped a USO tour with stops in Turkey, Qatar, and Afghanistan, the actress arrives with a stuffy nose, wearing Levi’s jeans, large-frame glasses, Adidas Superstars, and a Yankees cap. She looks more like your cool girlfriend than a movie-star goddess. But don’t be fooled: She is the latter.

On the controversy surrounding her casting as the lead in Ghost in a Shell: “I certainly would never presume to play another race of a person. Diversity is important in Hollywood, and I would never want to feel like I was playing a character that was offensive. Also, having a franchise with a female protagonist driving it is such a rare opportunity. Certainly, I feel the enormous pressure of that—the weight of such a big property on my shoulders.”

On being the highest-grossing actress in Hollywood history: “Just because I’m the top-grossing actress of all time does not mean I’m the highest paid. I’ve had to fight for everything that I have. It’s such a fickle and political industry.”

On being reluctant to discuss the wage gap: “Some people felt I should talk about my personal struggle in order to shed a spotlight on the greater issue. Maybe I’m being presumptuous, but I assumed it was obvious that women in all positions struggle for equality. It’s always an uphill battle and fight. My experience with my close female friends and family is that the struggle is real for everybody. Everyone has been discriminated against or harassed—sexism is real.”

On her daughter watching her in movies: “I don’t think she’s allowed to see any of the movies I’ve made, other than Sing. I’ll be happy when she’s old enough to show her movies where I kicked some a**.”

On no subject being off-limits with her friends: “I want to talk about what’s happening with your vagina. I want to know why it hates you or whatever. I want to compare and contrast notes. I want to talk about sex and all that stuff.”

On celebrities being vocal about politics: “[I believe] that it is really important to hear people in various positions of power voice their opinions, their story. Why not? Why can’t I have the voice? Why can’t I use my platform? What’s the point of having it if you don’t use it? If you don’t want to get involved, please, the noise is loud enough. But if you’ve got something to say, say it.”

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NEW YORK TIMES – The movie business is changing. Women have become increasingly visible as directors (Kathryn Bigelow, Lisa Cholodenko, Ava DuVernay) and successful producers (Reese Witherspoon’s production company Pacific Standard scored huge hits with “Gone Girl” and “Wild”; Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy won an Oscar in 2016 for the documentary short “A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness”). Yet many actresses are still paid less than their male peers, and the Academy Awards of 2016 were widely criticized for the lack of nonwhite nominees.

Only a few A-list actresses have been celebrated for their ability to throw punches or show menace on the screen, but that’s beginning to change as well. Scarlett Johansson, 32, received critical acclaim for her role as an alien on the hunt in “Under the Skin” and will appear in 2017 as a crime-fighting policewoman in “Ghost in the Shell.” Her superstar turn as the Black Widow in “The Avengers” series has helped to make her the highest-grossing actress of all time, pulling in over $3.3 billion for movie studios, according to Box Office Mojo. Still, as of this fall, she was the only woman in the top 20 on Mojo’s list.

In an interview, Ms. Johansson discusses how women’s roles in real life are changing their roles in film. The conversation has been edited and abridged.

The world has watched you grow up on screen — you started so early. Over the course of that time, the roles available to women in real life have changed a lot. Is the process of filmmaking starting to reflect that?

We see more female directors, more women in various departments on set. If you looked around a film set even 10 years ago, it was basically a bunch of dudes; maybe in the wardrobe department or in the hair and makeup department there would be women. Now you see more female camera assistants, cinematographers, grips.

In the job that I’m on now, “Rock That Body,” there are a number of women working as crew members, as opposed to many other productions that I’ve been on.

Is this changing the experience of acting for you?

It’s nice to have a diverse group of people so that it doesn’t become so one-note — to have a female energy on set, to have different types of people and different vibes, and a more balanced creative environment.

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Labels: Articles and Interviews

What a cover shot, right? Scarlett looks incredible for Variety magazine’s Power of Women issue which features multiple cover stars–including Helen Mirren, Miley Cyrus, Laverne Cox and Ava Duvernay. Scarlett’s interview is available to read below, and outtakes from the shoot have also been uploaded.

VARIETY – Planned Parenthood has come under attack during the presidential election, as pro-life Republicans attempt to cut funding for the organization that provides abortions and an array of other medical services for women.

“It’s pretty terrifying,” says Scarlett Johansson. “Somehow, a woman’s right to choose has become a subject that’s on the Republican platform. I don’t really know what it has to do with politics at all. It seems to be a deeply personal issue.”

Growing up in New York, the actress relied on Planned Parenthood for regular checkups, she says.
“I used them to screen me for STDs or take care of my reproductive health, as did all my girlfriends. When I was asked to represent their initiative, it was a no-brainer.”

Planned Parenthood turns 100 this year, with 650 health centers across the U.S. that see 2.5 million patients a year for cancer screenings, birth control, STD testing, and breast exams.

Johansson is a major advocate of such services. In 2012, she made Planned Parenthood and women’s health central themes of her speech at the Democratic National Convention. Two years later, she helped design T-shirts to boost voting in the midterm elections, and she has recorded an audio message that encourages listeners to enroll in less-expensive insurance options available through the Affordable Care Act.

Her high-profile efforts on behalf of the nonprofit don’t stop there, according to Caren Spruch, Planned Parenthood’s director of arts and entertainment engagement.

“She even filmed a video about the impact that Congressional assaults would have on millions of women who rely on Planned Parenthood when she was on location shooting a film,” Spruch says.

Johansson is enhancing her efforts by publicly backing Hillary Clinton, who has vowed to support Planned Parenthood if elected president.

“Hillary is the right candidate for right now,” Johansson says. “I think she’s got a lot of integrity. She’s got a lot of stamina. She’s a very clever politician, and that’s actually important to me. Maybe it’s because I have a daughter now.”

Labels: Articles and Interviews, Gallery Updates, Magazine Scans, Photoshoots

Almost ten years since her last feature (remember this?) for the magazine, Scarlett is once again gracing the pages of Flaunt–for their [CTRL-C]+[CTRL-V] issue. I’ve uploaded photos of the photoshoot to the gallery and the accompanying interview can be read below. Hopefully further coverage will be available for me to share with you very soon. Enjoy!

FLAUNT – Scarlett Johansson is curled comfortably on a stiff slate couch while she narrates to me the details of a popular YouTube video. “It’s two minutes-old twins and they’re being washed for the first time in warm water,” she says, “they’re in the position they were in in-utero and the warm water recreates the womb for them.” She tells me that the video is amazing, her face has a slight glow as she talks about it. “If you really want to see something miraculous,” she says, “It’s so beautiful.” I vow to watch it when I return home—I’d like to get a better understanding for what it must be like to have another human be a direct copy, a DNA complement to yourself. Having a twin sibling, like Johansson does, is a mystery to those who are unmatched.

“My brother and I started life this way,” she says. “In that sense, I’ve never really been alone—ever—which is interesting and probably affects my whole life. We’re extremely close. You have a witness to your life in my many ways. Even if we’re far apart, we have this deep connection with one another.”

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